Kettlehead Comics

for people with unusual heads

yungtapatio:

Actors revisit their famous movie roles

(Source: ed-pool)

jasonporath:

via A Mighty Girl:

23-year-old Harnaam Kaur has polycystic ovary syndrome, an endocrine disorder which often causes male pattern hair growth in women. Harnaam, who is from Berkshire, UK, began to experience significant hair growth by age 11 and teasing soon followed. As the bullying grew more intensive and classmates began calling her “beardo” and “sheman”, she began to self harm and even considered taking her own life.When she was baptized as a Sikh at age 16, Harnaam decided to adhere to the traditional Sikh tenet against hair removal. Her parents were opposed to the decision, concerned about her ability to have a normal life; however, she was determined. As Harnaam explained to HuffPost, “I wanted to make my own decisions and live for myself – not anyone else. I’d had enough of hiding. I’d had enough of the bullying and the self-harming and the suicidal thoughts. I wanted to change my whole outlook on life.”Since making the courageous decision to live life as she chooses, Harnaam says that her confidence has soared. She even decided to recently participate in a photography exhibit, Project 60, celebrating the world’s best facial hair. In speaking about the exhibit, which marks the launch of Beard Season, a non-profit organization focused on skin cancer awareness, Harnaam stated, “It’s incredible to be the only bearded woman among all these men. It makes me feel really strong… When I first started growing my beard it was for religious reasons but as the years have gone by I’ve kept it for more personal reasons. It makes me feel like a brave, confident woman who isn’t afraid to break society’s norms.”“All that matters to me at the moment is that I love myself,” she explained. “I love my beard and all my other little quirks – my tattoos, my scars, stretch marks and blemishes. I want other women to find the strength that I have. If I had any message it would be to live the way you want – it’s your journey and it’s your life.”Harnaam’s photo for the exhibit by photographer Brock Elbank is below. To view several more photos from the exhibit on The Guardian, visithttp://bit.ly/1r099sKFor an excellent picture book about a joyous young girl who is not afraid to be herself, quirks and all, we highly recommend “I Like Myself” for ages 3 to 8 at http://www.amightygirl.com/i-like-myself For many stories about girls grappling with body images issues, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Body Image” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/life-challenges?cat=378If you’d like to teach your kids to appreciate differences and foster their empathy for others, we’ve highlighted our favorite books on this theme for preschool and early elementary-aged children in our post “The End of Bullying Begins With Me” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=4741To help tweens and teens learn how to stand up for themselves and others in the face of bullying or intolerance, check out the reading recommendations in our post, “Taking a Stand Against Bullying” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=4804And, for over 200 books confidence-building books for Mighty Girls, visit our “Self-Confidence / Self-Esteem” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/health-wellness?cat=214

A reminder: Kaur means princess. :)
(thanks to Brian Davis for sending this in!)

jasonporath:

via A Mighty Girl:

23-year-old Harnaam Kaur has polycystic ovary syndrome, an endocrine disorder which often causes male pattern hair growth in women. Harnaam, who is from Berkshire, UK, began to experience significant hair growth by age 11 and teasing soon followed. As the bullying grew more intensive and classmates began calling her “beardo” and “sheman”, she began to self harm and even considered taking her own life.

When she was baptized as a Sikh at age 16, Harnaam decided to adhere to the traditional Sikh tenet against hair removal. Her parents were opposed to the decision, concerned about her ability to have a normal life; however, she was determined. As Harnaam explained to HuffPost, “I wanted to make my own decisions and live for myself – not anyone else. I’d had enough of hiding. I’d had enough of the bullying and the self-harming and the suicidal thoughts. I wanted to change my whole outlook on life.”

Since making the courageous decision to live life as she chooses, Harnaam says that her confidence has soared. She even decided to recently participate in a photography exhibit, Project 60, celebrating the world’s best facial hair. In speaking about the exhibit, which marks the launch of Beard Season, a non-profit organization focused on skin cancer awareness, Harnaam stated, “It’s incredible to be the only bearded woman among all these men. It makes me feel really strong… When I first started growing my beard it was for religious reasons but as the years have gone by I’ve kept it for more personal reasons. It makes me feel like a brave, confident woman who isn’t afraid to break society’s norms.”

“All that matters to me at the moment is that I love myself,” she explained. “I love my beard and all my other little quirks – my tattoos, my scars, stretch marks and blemishes. I want other women to find the strength that I have. If I had any message it would be to live the way you want – it’s your journey and it’s your life.”

Harnaam’s photo for the exhibit by photographer Brock Elbank is below. To view several more photos from the exhibit on The Guardian, visithttp://bit.ly/1r099sK

For an excellent picture book about a joyous young girl who is not afraid to be herself, quirks and all, we highly recommend “I Like Myself” for ages 3 to 8 at http://www.amightygirl.com/i-like-myself 

For many stories about girls grappling with body images issues, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Body Image” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/life-challenges?cat=378

If you’d like to teach your kids to appreciate differences and foster their empathy for others, we’ve highlighted our favorite books on this theme for preschool and early elementary-aged children in our post “The End of Bullying Begins With Me” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=4741

To help tweens and teens learn how to stand up for themselves and others in the face of bullying or intolerance, check out the reading recommendations in our post, “Taking a Stand Against Bullying” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=4804

And, for over 200 books confidence-building books for Mighty Girls, visit our “Self-Confidence / Self-Esteem” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/health-wellness?cat=214

A reminder: Kaur means princess. :)

(thanks to Brian Davis for sending this in!)

odlaws:

morticians

odlaws:

morticians

odlaws:

morticians

odlaws:

morticians

DA:I Companions

(Source: leftforbed, via juliedillon)

coelasquid:

comicsalliance:

WHY BIG SUPERHERO MUSCLES AREN’T ‘THE SAME THING’ AS SEXY CURVES
By Andrew Wheeler
As a man who reads superhero comics, I confess that I share a commonly-held prurient interest in big-chested, long-legged heroes in skin-baring costumes that barely cover their naughty bits — or as I like to call him, Namor.
Sadly, Namor is pretty much alone in his category. Contrary to the perception that male heroes in comics are frequently sexually objectified, it’s my experience that even Namor is only rarely presented as someone to lust over. Yet I’m fortunate that my tastes run towards the Hemsworth end of the scale. Like many straight men, I admire the kind of buff dudes that are the staple of superhero comics, even though they are rarely sexualized. If I shared the tastes of most of the women I know, I think I’d find superhero comics an even more frustratingly sexless wasteland.
Big muscles are a male fantasy. That’s not to say that women aren’t ever into them, but let’s face facts; women have never been the primary target audience for superhero comics, and male heroes are drawn with big muscles anyway. Make no mistake; women are there. But those big muscles are not there for women. They’re there for men; straight men who find male power exhilarating. If women didn’t exist, superheroes would be drawn just as buff as they are today — because as far as most superhero comics are concerned, women as consumers do not exist.
Yet I’ve seen it said more times than I can count that male heroes are objectified, sexualized, idealized, just the same as the women — because they’re big and ripped and dressed in tight costumes. It’s an idea that’s completely tied up in the narcissistic notion that androphile women are attracted to the same qualities that men find appealing.
Talk to a few women, and you’ll find that’s broadly untrue.
READ MORE

I realized at some point in a long history of being around guys who call every attractive dude they see “gay”, an unsettling number of straight dudes feel super uncomfortable around what is clearly supposed to be a sexually appealing man. Even if there’s a complete absence of evidence that he’s even gay at all and he’s completely minding his own business and not interacting with them in any way, it’s like if someone is attractive enough that this particular subsect of straight dudes are aware that he is desirable they freak out with insecurity at the fact that he’s handsome and they noticed.
Best example of it I can think of was this one time sitting in a restaurant with some friends and this group of dudes who looked like Russian models or something in white tank tops and jeans walked past us and sat down at a table on the other side of the room. There was kind of a moment of silence while they were passing, and as soon as they got out of earshot a lot of guffawing like “Ha ha they’re SO GAY am I right?” followed. And it was just like… Why? Because they’re so hot that your brain unwittingly acknowledged them as sexually appealing people? That sounds like a personal problem dude, I dunno. But that kind of behaviour is so normalized and so totally accepted in at least North American culture that companies will bend over backwards to accommodate these guys. I have no idea what market share “straight dudes who are super squicked out by sexy men” make up, but I can’t imagine they’re as much of a driving economic force as they’re given credit for.
So like… People can argue about the physiques being equally idealistic up and down the block, catering to that audience that freaks the fuck out out like they just saw a big gross bug when they see an attractive man presented in an alluring way are always going to push this false equivalency angle instead of acknowledging that if men in comics were on average actually as sexualized as women in comics regularly are, everything at your LCS would look like a Glen Hanson pinup

coelasquid:

comicsalliance:

WHY BIG SUPERHERO MUSCLES AREN’T ‘THE SAME THING’ AS SEXY CURVES

By Andrew Wheeler

As a man who reads superhero comics, I confess that I share a commonly-held prurient interest in big-chested, long-legged heroes in skin-baring costumes that barely cover their naughty bits — or as I like to call him, Namor.

Sadly, Namor is pretty much alone in his category. Contrary to the perception that male heroes in comics are frequently sexually objectified, it’s my experience that even Namor is only rarely presented as someone to lust over. Yet I’m fortunate that my tastes run towards the Hemsworth end of the scale. Like many straight men, I admire the kind of buff dudes that are the staple of superhero comics, even though they are rarely sexualized. If I shared the tastes of most of the women I know, I think I’d find superhero comics an even more frustratingly sexless wasteland.

Big muscles are a male fantasy. That’s not to say that women aren’t ever into them, but let’s face facts; women have never been the primary target audience for superhero comics, and male heroes are drawn with big muscles anyway. Make no mistake; women are there. But those big muscles are not there for women. They’re there for men; straight men who find male power exhilarating. If women didn’t exist, superheroes would be drawn just as buff as they are today — because as far as most superhero comics are concerned, women as consumers do not exist.

Yet I’ve seen it said more times than I can count that male heroes are objectified, sexualized, idealized, just the same as the women — because they’re big and ripped and dressed in tight costumes. It’s an idea that’s completely tied up in the narcissistic notion that androphile women are attracted to the same qualities that men find appealing.

Talk to a few women, and you’ll find that’s broadly untrue.

READ MORE

I realized at some point in a long history of being around guys who call every attractive dude they see “gay”, an unsettling number of straight dudes feel super uncomfortable around what is clearly supposed to be a sexually appealing man. Even if there’s a complete absence of evidence that he’s even gay at all and he’s completely minding his own business and not interacting with them in any way, it’s like if someone is attractive enough that this particular subsect of straight dudes are aware that he is desirable they freak out with insecurity at the fact that he’s handsome and they noticed.

Best example of it I can think of was this one time sitting in a restaurant with some friends and this group of dudes who looked like Russian models or something in white tank tops and jeans walked past us and sat down at a table on the other side of the room. There was kind of a moment of silence while they were passing, and as soon as they got out of earshot a lot of guffawing like “Ha ha they’re SO GAY am I right?” followed. And it was just like… Why? Because they’re so hot that your brain unwittingly acknowledged them as sexually appealing people? That sounds like a personal problem dude, I dunno. But that kind of behaviour is so normalized and so totally accepted in at least North American culture that companies will bend over backwards to accommodate these guys. I have no idea what market share “straight dudes who are super squicked out by sexy men” make up, but I can’t imagine they’re as much of a driving economic force as they’re given credit for.

So like… People can argue about the physiques being equally idealistic up and down the block, catering to that audience that freaks the fuck out out like they just saw a big gross bug when they see an attractive man presented in an alluring way are always going to push this false equivalency angle instead of acknowledging that if men in comics were on average actually as sexualized as women in comics regularly are, everything at your LCS would look like a Glen Hanson pinup

image

image

keikilanidraws:

sno4wy:

How To Draw Better In 2 Minutes

I expected this to be a troll video about sacrificing your soul in exchange for art skills or something but this was actually very informative.

(via wakor)

missolivialouise:

Here’s a thing I’ve had around in my head for a while!

Okay, so I’m pretty sure that by now everyone at least is aware of Steampunk, with it’s completely awesome Victorian sci-fi aesthetic. But what I want to see is Solarpunk – a plausible near-future sci-fi genre, which I like to imagine as based on updated Art Nouveau, Victorian, and Edwardian aesthetics, combined with a green and renewable energy movement to create a world in which children grow up being taught about building electronic tech as well as food gardening and other skills, and people have come back around to appreciating artisans and craftspeople, from stonemasons and smithies, to dress makers and jewelers, and everyone in between. A balance of sustainable energy-powered tech, environmental cities, and wicked cool aesthetics. 

A lot of people seem to share a vision of futuristic tech and architecture that looks a lot like an ipod – smooth and geometrical and white. Which imo is a little boring and sterile, which is why I picked out an Art Nouveau aesthetic for this.

With energy costs at a low, I like to imagine people being more inclined to focus their expendable income on the arts!

Aesthetically my vision of solarpunk is very similar to steampunk, but with electronic technology, and an Art Nouveau veneer.

So here are some buzz words~

Natural colors!
Art Nouveau!
Handcrafted wares!
Tailors and dressmakers!
Streetcars!
Airships!
Stained glass window solar panels!!!
Education in tech and food growing!
Less corporate capitalism, and more small businesses!
Solar rooftops and roadways!
Communal greenhouses on top of apartments!
Electric cars with old-fashioned looks!
No-cars-allowed walkways lined with independent shops!
Renewable energy-powered Art Nouveau-styled tech life!

Can you imagine how pretty it would be to have stained glass windows everywhere that are actually solar panels? The tech is already headed in that direction!  Or how about wide-brim hats, or parasols that are topped with discreet solar panel tech incorporated into the design, with ports you can stick your phone charger in to?

(((Character art by me; click the cityscape pieces to see artist names)))

(via hooligancaptain)

desdemonia:

image

this is what i’m doing instead of finishing this illustration
no regrets

fuckyeahpoetryslam:

iheartfailure:

altlitgossip:

'male novelist jokes' by mallory ortberg

Sounds about right.

"Women wouldn’t understand it they are too gay"

(via eliasgoliath)

hannahblumenreich:

other people make comics like, “this one time [truamatic event]” and i’m like, “once i tried to pee in a pool but i couldn’t.” 

anyway i made this for 2D cloud mini. the covers are here and also here

(via ktshy)

pybun:


Graceful Assassins [SFM] 

i think this one’s a better angle

pybun:

Graceful Assassins [SFM] 

i think this one’s a better angle

image

babygoatsandfriends:

another-side-o-me:

Meet Clyde…

omfg

unexplained-events:

Just the two of us

Photographer Klaus Pichler takes pictures of Australian Cosplayers in their homes against the backdrop of their everyday lives. He says that the unknown identities and mundane activities give this project a very mysterious vibe.

You can view more of his amazing projects HERE

(via eliasgoliath)